The radiometric dating

This rate of decay is constant for a given isotope, and the time it takes for one-half of a particular isotope to decay is its radioactive half-life.

For example, about 1.5 percent of a quantity of Uranium 238 will decay to lead every 100 million years.

But it wasn't until the late 1700s -- when Scottish geologist James Hutton, who observed sediments building up on the landscape, set out to show that rocks were time clocks -- that serious scientific interest in geological age began.

Before then, the Bible had provided the only estimate for the age of the world: about 6,000 years, with Genesis as the history book.

Since the biblical timeline indicates a young earth that’s only about 6,000 years old, creation scientists must address the radiometric dating issue. It kicks off ICR’s new In-Depth Science book series by demonstrating that radiometric dating is not based on the scientific method but rather on assumptions that cannot be observationally verified. In addition to working at Fermilab for 23 years, where he managed the operation of the Radioisotope Analysis Facility, Dr.

The use of radiometric dating was first published in 1907 by Bertram Boltwood and is now the principal source of information about the absolute age of rocks and other geological features, including the age of the Earth itself, and can be used to date a wide range of natural and man-made materials.

Hutton's theories were short on evidence at first, but by 1830 most scientists concurred that Noah's ark was more allegory than reality as they documented geological layering.

Using fossils as guides, they began to piece together a crude history of Earth, but it was an imperfect history.

The radioactive parent elements used to date rocks and minerals are: Radiometric dating using the naturally-occurring radioactive elements is simple in concept even though technically complex.

If we know the number of radioactive parent atoms present when a rock formed and the number present now, we can calculate the age of the rock using the decay constant.

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After all, the ever-changing Earth rarely left a complete geological record.

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